This Photographer goes Salvador Dali with his Images

If you’ve ever had a dream that words can’t explain, you might feel drawn to explaining it through images.

Artists—of past century in particular—have been fascinated with the erratic movements of the subconscious. As something that no one can quite explain or put their finger on, the subconscious world is one that can only be properly examined through artistic mediums.

We’ve seen it in movies like Eternal Sunshine of The Spotless Mind, and we’ve seen it in paintings like Salvador Dali’s The Persistence of Memory.  Today, we can see it in photographer Platon Yurich’s work.

woman, sky, earth

Yurich’s images all consist of a disorienting balance of reality and fantasy.  In one, a man in a bowler hat paints night onto dusk. In another, a woman and her book fall from space into earth’s atmosphere.

The images are playful and provoking. They invite the audience to see the world through a different scope, a lens through which the textures and dimensions that we are used to are eradicated and replaced.

The images all follow a surrealist nature.  Even the ones that don’t feature a silhouette in the sky or water that folds like a cloth are dream-like in the way that the subjects are oriented and the colors are heightened. The pictures take the solidarity of life as we know it and use it it as a platform to jump into a highly-sensitized world.

bowler hat, image

umbrella, hat, leaves

Yurich’s images are reminiscent of Rene Magritte, a surrealist painter, because of his repeated uses of a man in a bowler hat. In one photograph, the man stands on water as he fishes. In another, he looks down a hallway to see his suit and hat walking without him. Like Magritte’s painting, “The Son of Man,” Yurich’s bowler-hat-man seems to be searching for an identity. That being said, Yurich’s subject does so in a much lighter, whimsical manner. In another, less haunting image, the bowler-hat-man holds an umbrella that rains leaves over a little girl.

Yurich’s photos also feature many subjects that are dancing. This just adds to the magical feeling that his pictures elicit. His dream-world is one where his subjects are content with their surroundings-something that not a whole lot of us feel in our day-to-day lives.

dance, waterm umbrella

It feels that these images, in fact, are more than just renditions of dreams.  Yurich takes the disorienting dream world and sets it in a landscape that we are all just familiar enough with to appreciate. His backgrounds—trees, cityscapes, oceans—are all things that we have seen before. Yurich simply flips them on their axis, and that’s what makes them so effective.

You can check out more of Yurich’s fascinating images here.

All Images are by Platon Yurich.

This Photographer goes Salvador Dali with his Images

If you’ve ever had a dream that words can’t explain, you might feel drawn to explaining it through images.

Artists—of past century in particular—have been fascinated with the erratic movements of the subconscious. As something that no one can quite explain or put their finger on, the subconscious world is one that can only be properly examined through artistic mediums.

We’ve seen it in movies like Eternal Sunshine of The Spotless Mind, and we’ve seen it in paintings like Salvador Dali’s The Persistence of Memory.  Today, we can see it in photographer Platon Yurich’s work.

woman, sky, earth

Yurich’s images all consist of a disorienting balance of reality and fantasy.  In one, a man in a bowler hat paints night onto dusk. In another, a woman and her book fall from space into earth’s atmosphere.

The images are playful and provoking. They invite the audience to see the world through a different scope, a lens through which the textures and dimensions that we are used to are eradicated and replaced.

The images all follow a surrealist nature.  Even the ones that don’t feature a silhouette in the sky or water that folds like a cloth are dream-like in the way that the subjects are oriented and the colors are heightened. The pictures take the solidarity of life as we know it and use it it as a platform to jump into a highly-sensitized world.

bowler hat, image

umbrella, hat, leaves

Yurich’s images are reminiscent of Rene Magritte, a surrealist painter, because of his repeated uses of a man in a bowler hat. In one photograph, the man stands on water as he fishes. In another, he looks down a hallway to see his suit and hat walking without him. Like Magritte’s painting, “The Son of Man,” Yurich’s bowler-hat-man seems to be searching for an identity. That being said, Yurich’s subject does so in a much lighter, whimsical manner. In another, less haunting image, the bowler-hat-man holds an umbrella that rains leaves over a little girl.

Yurich’s photos also feature many subjects that are dancing. This just adds to the magical feeling that his pictures elicit. His dream-world is one where his subjects are content with their surroundings-something that not a whole lot of us feel in our day-to-day lives.

dance, waterm umbrella

It feels that these images, in fact, are more than just renditions of dreams.  Yurich takes the disorienting dream world and sets it in a landscape that we are all just familiar enough with to appreciate. His backgrounds—trees, cityscapes, oceans—are all things that we have seen before. Yurich simply flips them on their axis, and that’s what makes them so effective.

You can check out more of Yurich’s fascinating images here.

All Images are by Platon Yurich.